Feminism in the Everyday: A Photo Essay

Hello dearest listeners, this post is a variation from our norm here at Feminist Poltergeist. It is serving as a creative assignment for a course on creative research, social justice, and feminist practice. As the essay relates to Feminist Poltergeist and gives you a sneak peak of our studio space (aka the nicest of incorporeal bedrooms) we decided to host it here on our site. Hope you enjoy this look at our studio and art practice plus cats!

 Me and my mentors. Learning how to create queer feminist works by being in community with women who learned by doing and from each other. (visible on ipod screen Witch, Please!, Fangirl Happy Hour, Fansplaining, Feminist Frequency Radio, and Radio Free Fandom. links to each at the bottom of this post)

Me and my mentors. Learning how to create queer feminist works by being in community with women who learned by doing and from each other. (visible on ipod screen Witch, Please!, Fangirl Happy Hour, Fansplaining, Feminist Frequency Radio, and Radio Free Fandom. links to each at the bottom of this post)

 Our shared space. Created by me and Francis (not in picture) for our relaxation, inspiration, and community building. Featuring Borbie (center) and Fiona (left).

Our shared space. Created by me and Francis (not in picture) for our relaxation, inspiration, and community building. Featuring Borbie (center) and Fiona (left).

 My studio, minus the artist. Featuring Fiona in her typical spot. I curate this space over the past three years to be cozy, comfortable, and full of feminist art, writing, and inspiration. The curtains were made by my mother, an artist in her own right. While the cheerful curtains serve the purpose of helping with sound quality they were originally created due to Borbie destroying the blinds like a true cat.

My studio, minus the artist. Featuring Fiona in her typical spot. I curate this space over the past three years to be cozy, comfortable, and full of feminist art, writing, and inspiration. The curtains were made by my mother, an artist in her own right. While the cheerful curtains serve the purpose of helping with sound quality they were originally created due to Borbie destroying the blinds like a true cat.

 A closer look at the studio (still featuring Fiona who due to her proximity and chattiness during recording is often credited as contributor and guest editor). This is a better view of what I see while setting up to record a podcast episode.

A closer look at the studio (still featuring Fiona who due to her proximity and chattiness during recording is often credited as contributor and guest editor). This is a better view of what I see while setting up to record a podcast episode.

 What I see when I look up from the mic lost for words while recording. My convention badges with their ribbons and medals from charity races remind me what I've achieved since I started being an activist and advocate and began doing feminist research. The calendar with it's stickers awarded for meeting writing, recording, and research goals encourages me to keep going. And coincidentally, the stickers were something I started doing after learning about it from other feminist podcasters and bloggers. The prints were both created by feminist artists. The print on the lower left was from a show featuring art by survivors of sexual assault. The print of Emma Goldman was made by Ruth Bryant, a bookmaker who lived in Iowa while completing her PhD work at the Center for the Book (she's rad, y'all. her books are beautiful and heartbreaking. I had the pleasure of working with her on a couple different projects).

What I see when I look up from the mic lost for words while recording. My convention badges with their ribbons and medals from charity races remind me what I've achieved since I started being an activist and advocate and began doing feminist research. The calendar with it's stickers awarded for meeting writing, recording, and research goals encourages me to keep going. And coincidentally, the stickers were something I started doing after learning about it from other feminist podcasters and bloggers. The prints were both created by feminist artists. The print on the lower left was from a show featuring art by survivors of sexual assault. The print of Emma Goldman was made by Ruth Bryant, a bookmaker who lived in Iowa while completing her PhD work at the Center for the Book (she's rad, y'all. her books are beautiful and heartbreaking. I had the pleasure of working with her on a couple different projects).

 My view while recording. My beautiful Snowball mic. The Snowball and the Yeti are the two mics I most heard recommended from other pocasters, and as the snowball is less expensive (though still a hit to the pocketbook, yeah, I still carry a pocketbook. What of it?) it's the one I went with. Out of focus on the laptop screen are the two things I need to record, my script and Garageband (Garageband is considered an inferior software by most podcasters, but I don't have room for anything else on my laptop).

My view while recording. My beautiful Snowball mic. The Snowball and the Yeti are the two mics I most heard recommended from other pocasters, and as the snowball is less expensive (though still a hit to the pocketbook, yeah, I still carry a pocketbook. What of it?) it's the one I went with. Out of focus on the laptop screen are the two things I need to record, my script and Garageband (Garageband is considered an inferior software by most podcasters, but I don't have room for anything else on my laptop).

 What it all comes down to in my studio practice. My voice. In one of my favorite episodes of Witch, Please!, a Harry Potter podcast hosted by two Canadian academics, they discuss the power and importance of women's and queer folks' voices. Putting my queer trans disabled feminist voice out there is a radical act and is at the center of my art practice. Putting other queer trans voices out there is one of the goals of my work, and I try to do that by talking about their work, how it has influenced my ideas, and giving them credit both vocally and by linking their work in my posts.

What it all comes down to in my studio practice. My voice. In one of my favorite episodes of Witch, Please!, a Harry Potter podcast hosted by two Canadian academics, they discuss the power and importance of women's and queer folks' voices. Putting my queer trans disabled feminist voice out there is a radical act and is at the center of my art practice. Putting other queer trans voices out there is one of the goals of my work, and I try to do that by talking about their work, how it has influenced my ideas, and giving them credit both vocally and by linking their work in my posts.

 Finally, after hours of unseen editing my work is out there and hopefully will work to lift up the work of the people who inspire me.

Finally, after hours of unseen editing my work is out there and hopefully will work to lift up the work of the people who inspire me.